German carmaker Audi has just introduced the new Audi SQ5 TDI, a diesel variant of the SQ5 range and while it may have the same 3.0-litre V6 setup, it now makes 700 Nm – 200 Nm more than its petrol-powered TFSI sibling.

Together with 347 hp and a permanent all-wheel drive system, it will take the SQ5 TDI just five seconds to hit the 100 km/h mark from standstill – that’s Volkswagen Golf R territory!

In normal driving conditions, torque between the front and rear is distributed at a 40:60 ratio. Up to 70% of the power can be sent to the front or 85% to the back, depending on the situation.

At full boost, the large Variable Turbine Geometry (VTG) turbochargers can generate up to 2.4 bar of pressure, while a sound actuator in the exhaust system helps produce a full-bodied exhaust note.

The SQ5 TDI’s performance is aided by a 48-volt main electrical system consisting of an Electric-Powered Compressor (EPC) that supports the turbocharger – helping it to spool faster – along with a mild hybrid system.

The mild hybrid system on the other hand helps recuperate energy under braking, and stores them in a compact lithium-ion battery that placed under the boot floor, with an electrical capacity of 10 Ah.

The Audi SQ5 TDI’s suspension comes as standard with damper control unlike the standard Q5. It also lowers the car significantly without sacrificing comfort and practicality. As an option, there’s also the S-specific adaptive air suspension.

Braking performance has also been upgraded with 6-pot calipers in the front, beneath a set of 20-inch cast aluminium wheels.

The cabin is unmistakably Audi, with Alcantara, leather and brushed aluminium occupying all the touch points. While the exterior does not differ from the petrol-powered model, there is a Panther Black paint job that’s exclusively for the SQ5 TDI.


IMAGE GALLERY


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Pan Eu Jin
Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.