After more than a decade in production, the last Bentley Mulsanne has rolled off the production line. This marks the end of Mulsanne after more than 7,300 units have been handcrafted at Bentley’s home in Crewe, England.

In the past 11 years of the Bentley Mulsanne’s production, over 700 people have spent three million hours crafting Bentley’s flagship limo. The intricacies of the Mulsanne is no laughing matter with over a million hours spent creating the leather upholstery and 90,000 hours spent polishing the cars. Once that’s done, the Mulsanne undergoes over four million individual quality checkpoints.

“The Mulsanne is the culmination of all that we at Bentley have learnt during our first 100 years in producing the finest luxury cars in the world. As the flagship of our model range for over a decade, the Mulsanne has firmly solidified its place in the history of Bentley as nothing less than a true icon. I am immensely proud of the hundreds of designers, engineers and craftspeople that brought the Mulsanne to life over the last ten years,” said Bentley Chairman and CEO, Adrian Hallmark.

Earlier this month, Bentley also put to sleep another one of its long running icons – the 6.75-litre V8 engine. The iconic engine has been in production for over 60 years, bearing the same configuration (albeit with modern touches along the way) since 1959.

At the height of its development, the engine made over 500 hp and over 1,000 Nm of torque when it found its way into the Mulsanne Speed.

Closer to home, Bentley Kuala Lumpur recently introduced the Bentayga V8 Design Series to the tune of RM1.04 million before taxes/duties and options. The 4.0-litre turbocharged petrol-powered V8 in the Design Series makes 550 hp and 770 Nm of torque with 0 to 100 km/h done in just 4.4 seconds.


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Pan Eu Jin
Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.