Honda e Prototype: Rear-wheel drive, no wing mirrors, over 200 km range


While the actual unveiling is in a week’s time at the Geneva motor show, Honda has revealed more on what is arguably its most important product of the decade, maybe even this century. Enter the fully electric Honda e Prototype.

Before we dive into the details, it’s worth recapping that the e Prototype was originally the Urban EV Concept that got everyone excited with its cute retro take on the original Civic at the 2017 Frankfurt motor show. And we’ve been craving for more information since.

Despite the name, the e Prototype is ‘95% production ready’, so you’re looking at pretty much the production car.

Well, we know more now. The e Prototype is slightly shorter than a Jazz, it will deliver an electric range of ‘over 200km’ (can be rapid charged up to 80% in 30 minutes like most EVs) but lo and behold, it is also rear-wheel drive, with torque vectoring for good measure!

The e Prototype is has largely kept to the original concept’s minimalist styling and is supposed to be ‘95%’ of the production version. The bodystyle is a five-door hatch that seats four occupants (the rear door handles are flushed and ‘hidden’ on the C-pillar), packing lithium-ion batteries the floor. Instead of wing mirrors, it has side-mounted cameras and cool pop-up front door handles. The side view is projected on LCD displays on each end of dashboard which flank the central touchscreens. Oh, the ‘wood’ on the dash is actually a printed adhesive film while the seat covers are made of recycled polyester.

We count at least five digital displays on the dash; the e Protoype will also come with semi-autonomous driving functions.

The 200 km electric range is admittedly a bit underwhelming, but Honda says the e Prototype is a car that ‘meets the needs of the modern urban environment‘, so it is unlikely to the electric equivalent of the S660 sports car, but does it matter when the ‘want’ is this strong?


Denis Wong

Denis Wong

In the age of misinformation and spin, Denis prefers candour and a counterpoint, because the truth matters.
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