Mercedes-Benz is having a jam-packed 2021 IAA Motor Show at Munich this year. Alongside the launch of the electric G-Wagen concept with the EQG, the first fully-electric AMG model in the EQS, the EQE, as well as the Maybach EQS, Mercedes-Benz has also brought out the fully-electric EQB seven-seater compact SUV to further expand its electric vehicles line-up.

The fully-electric Mercedes-Benz EQB is based on its fossil fuel-burning counterpart, the GLB, which is also related to the GLA that forms the basis of the EQA. As such, the two electric compact crossovers essentially share the same powertrain offerings, and many of the key components.

The Mercedes-Benz EQA is a compact EV crossover based on the GLA. Check it out here!

At launch, the EQB is available in two all-wheel drive configurations – the EQB 300 4Matic with an output of 168 kW (225 hp) and 390 Nm, alongside the EQB 350 4Matic which bumps the power output up to 215 kW (288 hp) and 520 Nm of torque.

The more powerful EQB 350 takes 6.2 seconds to go from 0-100 km/h (8 seconds on the EQB 300), though both variants are pegged at a top speed of 160 km/h.

Both models are also equipped with the same 66.5 kWh capacity lithium-ion battery pack located underneath the rear seats, offering a driving range of up to 419 km based on the WLTP test cycle.

Charging up the battery with the on-board 11 kW charger takes roughly 5 hours and 15 minutes, though a 100 kW DC fast charger can top it up in roughly 32 minutes.

At the launch event, Mercedes-Benz said that a “particular long-range” EQB will be coming in the future, though gave no indication of the battery capacity and its rated driving range.

An entry-level front-wheel driven EQB 250 model featuring the EQA 250’s 188 hp/375 Nm single motor set-up will also be added into the model-line-up sometime soon, which should offer a significant cost savings over the two launch models.

The Mercedes-Benz GLB was launched in Malaysia last year, with three variants on offer – GLB 200, GLB 250, and the AMG GLB 35. Check them out in more detail here!

In terms of design, Mercedes-Benz gave the EQB a similar styling treatment as they did for the EQA when they adapted the petrol model to electric power. These include a black-panel grille up front featuring a new light bar, new model-specific head and tail lights, new bumpers, and unique EQ-specific bi- or tri-colour design alloys ranging from 18- to 20-inches.

As an option, customers can also opt for the AMG Line package, which offers AMG bodystyling with the new front and rear bumpers, alongside 20-inch wheels painted in matte copper for a unique sporty undertone.

Inside, the Mercedes-Benz EQB is equipped with a EV-specific navigational system within its MBUX infotainment software that is able to plan its routes according to its battery charging needs. However, the rest of the cabin is pretty much lifted wholesale from the regular GLB.

Customers can opt for an “Electric Art” package for the interior, which adds unique rose gold and blue accents onto several trim elements such as the air vents and seats – the same colour scheme is also mirrored onto the MBUX system, which gets four EQ-specific themes – Modern Classic, Sport, Progressive and Discreet mode.

The G-Wagen is finally going electric! Read more about it here.

Due to the modifications made to the platform to accommodate the electric components, the boot capacity did suffer slightly, dropping to 495 litres (from 560 litres in the GLB) in the five-seater version. With the rear seats folded away, the five-seater EQB’s luggage capacity is rated at 1710 litres.

In terms of safety, the Mercedes-Benz EQB is equipped with a massive suite of advanced driver assistance features, including level two autonomous driving capabilities. Other standard features include Active Speed Limit Assist with Traffic Sign Assist, Evasive Steering Assist, Active Lane Keeping Assist, Active Brake Assist, and Active Blind Spot Assist.


GALLERY