Has it already seen the future of electric mobility? Perhaps.

The EV carries Hyundai’s latest design philosophy called “Sensuous Sportiness” that strips away complexity in favour of clean lines and minimalist structures.

If anything, it resembles the silhouette of a Porsche Panamera, with a rear end and spoiler that looks like a 911 from the future.

Hyundai said the dynamic and elegant boat-tail line created by the rear quarter panels appear to propel the form forward even when it’s standing still.

Aside from visual appeal, the design provides excellent aerodynamics – a characteristic indispensable to EVs. Beneath the bumper is an enormous air intake to draw air in to cool the batteries while the propeller-shaped wheels direct air to flow down the side of the body “like water over a stone”, according to Hyundai.

Items such as the headlamps and spoiler are made of transparent acrylic material to provide a clear view of the components that make up the internal structure.

The striking pixel lamp lighting technology can be seen on the spoiler, head and tail lamps. This technology will be carried forward as a signature design element in future Hyundai models.

Inside, the Prophecy fully utilises the spacious cabin that’s common in EV vehicles. Instead of a conventional steering wheel, the Prophecy is fitted with two joystick for a supposedly “more assuring and intuitive driving experience”.

By offering two joysticks that can pivot left and right, one in the centre console and another on the door trim, drivers are able to control the vehicle from a position of comfort.

The Prophecy features a “Relax Mode” that when engaged, offers passengers virtually zero visual obstacles. When in a reclined position, all that the passengers see is the horizontal pillar-to-pillar display and the wing-shaped dashboard.

Also in this mode, the dashboard swivels, allowing for a spacious interior and seat position from which passengers are able to enjoy content shown on the display.


IMAGE GALLERY


Previous articleAll-new Audi A3 Sportback: Don’t fix what’s not broken
Next articleNew EQ Power plug-in hybrids to help Mercedes-Benz achieve CO2 compliance
Pan Eu Jin
Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.