There’s probably nothing we can prescribe to you that you haven’t already done this MCO so it’s a good thing car companies, aside from channeling their resources to build ventilators, have gotten creative with their content.

Instead of new car and tech announcements, Audi for example has put together a colouring book, featuring Audis of various generations and now Toyota has done this – a GT86 paper cut-out with six different retro-inspired liveries.

These GT86s were originally created for the 2015 Goodwood Festival of Speed to help commemorate 50 years of Toyota in the UK. Upon unveiling, the crowd went wild according to Toyota hence the idea came about to give everyone an opportunity to have their own paper cut-out GT86.

Ideally, Toyota says, get it printed on A3 paper, rather than A4, for a less complicated build and a larger model at the end. Using scissors, carefully separate each of the three main sections (the roof and two sides) and each of the four tyre tracks from the grey background. Be careful not to cut off the little white tabs with dots on.

If you asked me, I’d say opt for a thicker, less crumple-prone piece of paper if you have butter fingers and cutters instead of scissors for better precision.

Here are the links to the six different retro-inspired GT86s:
Yatabe Speed Trial Toyota 2000GT
Shelby Toyota 2000GT
Ove Andersson’s Toyota Celica 1600GT
IMSA GTU Toyota Celica
Castrol Toyota Celica GT-Four
Esso Ultron Tiger Toyota Supra

Fold and glue all of these tabs so they adhere to the underside of the adjacent panel as doing so will pull the car into a three-dimensional shape that should resemble a Toyota GT86. Keyword is should.

Toyota says this activity is for older children (meaning us) and it should take about an hour to put together.


IMAGE GALLERY


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Pan Eu Jin
Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.