More images of the Infiniti QX80 Monograph has been released, now that the mega-SUV is making its appearance at the 2017 New York International Auto Show. It’s not a production car, but a “design study” that focuses on Infiniti’s future design language, particularly on the QX80.

The face is brasher this time round, featuring a much bigger ‘double-arch’ grille flanking a pair of ‘human-eye’ headlamps with ‘piano key’ LEDs. Another interesting feature are those LED eyebrows that stretches back on the front fenders, leading to a rear-facing camera on each side which replaces the side mirrors.

On the sides, the door handles sit flush to the body panels, and Infiniti says that the vents behind each wheel are not just decorative items, they eliminate turbulent and drag-inducing air from the wheel arches. The rims by the way, are actually 24-inch items, but they look bigger because the outer edges overlap the tyres by a couple of inches; a cheeky way to trick the bystanders. And you may also notice that they have altered the crescent-cut D-pillars with sharper and higher trailing edge.

The designers have made the back appear wider than before by playing with more horizontal lines. The tail lights are slimmer and wider, and they also use that same ‘piano key’ effect as the headlamps. By moving the number plate holder to the bumper makes the rear cleaner too.

Infiniti’s Vice President of Global Product Strategy said “The QX80 Monograph is an exploration of how we plan to take a step forward in the large SUV segment. This is an important initiative for Infiniti, as the QX80 is popular with buyers in a number of markets – particularly in North America and the Middle East.” Just in case if you’re wondering, the current-generation QX80 is actually available on sale here in Malaysia, costing just a couple of grand below RM800k.


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najdi U
Najdi appreciates and sees cars as more than just a transportation tool. He believes that driving is therapeutic and finds solace when cruising at 110 km/h. Given the chance, he prefers to drive than being driven.