The boys at Herthel, Norfolk, UK have cooked up four new limited-edition versions of the Elise – each with vibrant and distinctive colour schemes – to celebrate the company’s motorsport history.

Called the Elise Classic Heritage Editions – the new Elise is based on the Elise Sport 220 where a total of just 100 units will be built. Each comes exclusively with a numbered plaque on the dashboard referencing the model’s limited production run.

The Elise Sport 220 makes 220 hp and 250 Nm from a 1.8-litre supercharged engine capable of propelling the 924 kg car car from 0 to 100 km/h in just 4.6 seconds, onward to a top speed of 233 km/h.

The first, the black and gold model, pays tribute to the livery of the Lotus Type 72D, piloted by Emerson Fittipaldi to five race victories in the 1972 Formula 1 season. The red, white and gold model on the other hand, echoes the Type 49B that Graham Hill raced in 1968.

The blue, red and silver is inspired by the Lotus Type 81 of 1980 driven by Nigel Mansell, Elio de Angelis and Mario Andretti. Lastly, the blue and white model pays tribute to the Lotus Type 18 driven by the late Sir Stirling Moss – the first Lotus race car to clinch a Formula 1 pole position and victory at the 1960 Monaco Grand Prix.

Previously optional items, the new Elise Classic Heritage Editions now come with a digital radio with four speakers, cruise control, air-conditioning, ultra-lightweight forged alloy wheels and upgraded brakes.

Options available include a fibreglass hardtop roof, lightweight lithium-ion battery and titanium lightweight exhaust. Prices start from £46,250 (approx. RM246k) and Lotus says while it costs £6,350 (approx. RM33k) more than the standard Elise Sport 220, the Classic Heritage Edition models have been fitted with £11,000 (approx. RM58k) of additional features.


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Pan Eu Jin
Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.