Whether you can afford to buy it or not is one thing; whether Bugatti has any left to sell to you is the more important question.

That’s cause shortly after presenting it to a group of elite Chiron customers in a private preview, 40 units of the Bugatti Divo were snapped up immediately, at 5 million Euros (approx. RM23 million before tax) each.

The supercar is named after Albert Divo, a French racing driver who was a two-time winner of the famous Targa Florio race on the mountainous roads of Sicily with Bugatti in the late 1920s.

It’s powered by Bugatti’s iconic 8.0-litre W16 quad turbo engine with 1,500 hp, 1,600 Nm of torque and a 100-litre fuel tank. Power is delivered through a 7-speed DSG dual-clutch gearbox, to all four corners, rendering the 0 to 100 km/h run as nothing more than a sneeze in just 2.4 seconds!

Top speed is “limited” to 380 km/h, a long shot from the 500 km/h mark on its speedometer. Unlike the Chiron, the Divo does not have a “Top Speed mode” – it’s all or nothing with this 2-tonne bad boy.

With the Divo, Bugatti has developed a super sportscar tuned for agility, nimbleness and optimum handling performance on winding roads. As in the words of Bugatti President, Stephan Winkelmann, “The Divo is made for bends.”

The Divo is 35 kg lighter and has 90 kilograms more downforce than the standard Chiron and as a result, the Divo can lap the Nardò handling circuit in southern Italy eight seconds faster than the Chiron.

Honestly, looking at the press release, a lot of it is too geeky even for my reading pleasure, so I’m just going to share the interesting bits. Lets face it, you don’t want to know “which does what to the air and where it ends up” for better air flow. The Divo is the work of aerodynamic geniuses – end of story.

Here’s what’s new though; the Divo features a new, height-adjustable rear spoiler which functions as an air brake when turned forwards and is set to different angles for the individual driving modes. It’s even wider (by 23%) than the one on the Chiron!

Another highlight of the rear end is the new, cutting-edge 3D tail lamps with special lightweight fins of various sizes. A total of 44 of these fins light up, forming the rear light of the Divo.

At the outer edge, the fins become wider, creating a more intensive light. Towards the centre of the vehicle, they are narrower, resulting in gradual fading of the light.

The 35 kg weight saving is a result of intense weight saving measure. It’s got new lightweight wheels, a carbon fibre intercooler cover, reduction in insulation material and a lighter sound system. Even stowage compartments on the central console and in the door trims have been omitted – it’s like the weight-losing obsession of a neurotic bride-to-be.

As for the “wedding gown”, the Divo wears a matte finish – with a mix of Titanium Liquid Silver and Divo Racing Blue colours – specially-developed for the Divo. Its side skirts are exposed carbon fibre tinted in a petroleum blue shade, “Divo Carbon”, developed especially for this model.

The same Divo Racing Blue is also used as an Alcantara leather tone in the interior and is used almost throughout the driver’s section with lesser areas covered in the passenger’s section.

The door trims and seat areas feature an embroidered 3D rhomboid structure with an algorithmic configuration, reinterpreting the structure of the grille and rear lights.


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Pan Eu Jin
Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.