It’s never a pleasant experience watching cars getting crashed; even more so if its a classic, worst if it’s a classic Ferrari. The Ferrari 250 GTO is one of the most expensive cars in the world if not THE most expensive with previous auction prices fetching almost 50 million US dollars.

Enter the 250 GTO/64. At just a few million less, it may not be as expensive as the 250 GTO being the later generation and all but it’s still one of the rarest classic Ferrari’s out there with only three ever built in 1964; hence the GTO/64 moniker.

At the recent Goodwood Revival festival, the one and possibly only venue to catch a glimpse of precious, old classics pitting against each other, an incident that was unfathomable as the 250 GTO/64’s price tag took place; it was crashed. Driven by one Andy Newell, the precious piece of handmade Italian machinery was made to swerve to avoid crashing into the rear end of another precious Ferrari 250 LM as you’d see in the video.

This cause the 250 GTO/64 to slam into the tyre wall and suffer unspeakable damages on its rear end. By the way, it’s not Andy Newell’s personal car. These cars are usually loaned out to motoring journalist, personalities and race car drivers to push to the limits – for these cars to once again be driven like they were made to.

Here’s another angle of the painful crash…


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Pan Eu Jin
Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.