The Kia Telluride is the Korean car maker’s very own BMW X7


Ok, that may be a little far-fetched because the new BMW X7 is suppose to set a new benchmark in luxury – as least on BMW’s terms – but in terms of sheer size, presence and the ability to turn heads, I think it’s a very close second; in a Korean sort of way.

Designed and soon to be assembled in America, the proportions of the car (inside and out) just tells you that it’s catered to those with non-Asian physiques. The largest Kia ever and the first to be exclusive for the US market, is capable of accommodating up to eight passengers, with go-anywhere capabilities.

The source of this “freedom to roam” is a 3.8-litre V6 engine with 291 hp and 355 Nm of torque to power the front wheels through an 8-speed automatic gearbox. All-wheel drive capabilities are optional.

As attractive as the proportions are, I’m actually wondering if Kia scooped over a few designers from Cadillac’s drawing room because this thing, especially the front end with it’s tall, vertical headlamps and an oversized grille, looks rather similar to the 2019 Cadillac Escalade.

Either they’re trying to convert these traditional car buyers with a safe design that they’ve grown accustomed to, or it’s just the only way Americans know how to design cars. Take a look at the Hyundai Palisade and you’ll get what I mean.

Inside the Telluride, and I still can’t get over that name, is a myriad of modern day tech required by citizens of a developed nation. Aside from the “Kia Drive Wise” suite of Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems which includes the Forward Collision Warning, High Beam Assist and Lane Keeping Assist, features we’ve all grown to expect in a modern luxury vehicle, there are also items like the 10-speaker 603-watt Harman Kardon sound system with two USB ports on each row.

There’s also this feature called the Quiet Mode where engaged, the system will reduce audio output in second and third row so the audio selection of the front occupants are only heard in that row.


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Pan Eu Jin

Pan Eu Jin

Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.
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