It’s probably fair to pass the all-new Isuzu D-Max off as nothing less than impressive.

After soldiering for nearly a decade with a platform that should be in a museum than on a production line, the 3rd-generation D-Max has finally burst out of its cocoon and emerged as a beautiful butterfly.

The work that has gone into the new D-Max goes beyond its handsome new facade. It rides on a strengthened, more rigid and improved chassis with better brakes, equipped with modern amenities like Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, complemented by a more sophisticated interior design with improved NVH.

Better yet, the new D-Max is also equipped with a Blind-spot Monitoring System and Rear-Cross Traffic Alert for the first time ever.

It’s safe to assume that Isuzu isn’t contented anymore with their D-Max being labelled as nothing more than a workhorse; seeing as the Ford Ranger and Mitsubishi Triton, for example, are more “family-friendly” than ever.

Here’s the thing, when it arrives in Australia next year, it would have to be equipped with Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB) – a requirement of Australia’s testing body – if it were to be in contention for a 5-star ANCAP safety rating.

With that, local auto site CarsGuide reported that the Australian-spec D-Max is expected to be fitted with the system – something Malaysian car buyers seem to place increasing emphasis on.

Should the new D-Max arrive in Malaysia with AEB, the question then would be, would buyers be willing to pay the price?


IMAGE GALLERY


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Pan Eu Jin
Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can't afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents - unless resale value is your thing.