Caterham launches the new SuperSprint, powered by a 600cc Suzuki engine


Just a year after the launch of the Seven Sprint, the fastest selling Caterham to date with all available units sold within a week, Caterham has unveiled a new, limited-edition SuperSprint as a reflection of its 60th anniversary. Similarly, only 60 units will be available but unfortunately only destined for the European and UK markets.

The Super Sprint comes with 96 hp from turbocharged 600 c.c three-cylinder Suzuki engine tuned by Caterham Works Racing together with a 5-speed synchromesh transmission and a limited-slip differential. Stopping power is covered by Brembo’s twin-pot calipers in the front and drums at the back. 0 to 100 km/h takes 6.9 seconds with a top speed of approximately 160 km/h.

Managing the weight and balance of the retro-inspired body is a live rear axle with an A-frame developed by Caterham Works Racing, a race-inspired suspension package with adjustable platforms and Bilstein shock absorbers that tucks behind a set of 14-inch wheels.

On the outside the SuperSprint’s gains its flamboyance from extended front cycle wings, Twin Brookland’s aero screens, Le Mans style mesh grille and side intake topped off with racing livery from the 1960’s. The SuperSprint’s body colour options are inspired by colour schemes that represent legendary race tracks such as the Aintree, Hockenheim, Imola, Watkins Glen, Dijon and Zandvoort.

Inside, the quilted and stitched Scottish Muirhead leather interior comes with 12-inch wooden-rimmed, Moto-Lita steering wheel, a four-point harness, a master cut-off switch, a shift light, SMITHS dials and a unique numbered dash plaque.

A single-seater option is also available together with a tonneau cover for the more enthusiastic drivers looking to shed more weight of their already super light Caterham. Only difference is that, instead of the twin aero screen the single-seater comes with a single Brooklands aero screen and a single four-point harness.


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Pan Eu Jin

Pan Eu Jin

Regularly spend countless hours online looking at cars and parts I can’t afford to buy. How a car makes you feel behind the wheel should be more important than the brand it represents – unless resale value is your thing.

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